Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell


Eye-opening. 

That’s how I would sum up Malcolm Gladwell’s bestseller, Outliers. Though sporting a less-than-pleasing tint of yellow on every page of my copy (borrowed from my mother), this novel transcends the borders of time with evergreen subjects; those, that perpetually seem to captivate the masses. And it also does wonders by educating readers with (groan) educational content.


One such example is where he discusses a series of fatal and catastrophic crashes, one such instance being the (then-called) Korean Air Flight 801 on the 5th of August, 1997. 

In that chapter, he goes through, explains, and comes up with possible theories that are sure to enlighten one’s mind, with the input of people in the higher echelons of their respective fields. And you can expect similar yet interesting themes examined and elaborated by Gladwell in the other chapters in this 350-odd pages book.

Thanks to Gladwell’s in-depth and probably very laborious research, we can all enjoy and consume the gripping stories that he has stitched together.


I hope to read Gladwell’s fresh-off-the-press, book titled “Talking to Strangers”, which explores, to quote another reviewer, 

… our relationship with trust, truth, and the people we don’t know as well as we might have hoped.”


Now, enough of being an ambassador of “Cheeminology”, because I’m not going to waste any more time on this review. I awfully need to finish reading this wonderful book. 


P.S. By the way, a new word I learnt (acronym in this case) is “SSLANT“, which stands for:

  • Smile
  • Sit up
  • Ask questions
  • Nod when being spoken to
  • Track with your eyes

This actually refers to a protocol implemented by teachers in KIIP (a school in New York)  to the students, in which the students themselves must pretend to be aliens and address people very nicely. 

(Hmm… perhaps the former isn’t too true…)

Author: Malcolm Gladwell
Not-so-much-professional-author (aka reviewer): Thomas

Published by Thomas Rettig

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